Translation of lean manufacturing principles and practices to the software development

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DevOps: What Is the Lean Cloud and Why It Matters All clouds are not equal. To succeed in a DevOps context, organizations should plan to develop/deploy apps across a choice of on-premise and public clouds simultaneously depending on the business needs. This is where the concept of the Lean Cloud comes in - resting on the idea that you often need to relocate your app modules over their life cycles for both innovation and operational efficiency in the cloud. In his session at @DevOpsSummit at19th Cloud Expo, Valentin (Val) Bercovici, CTO of SolidFire, will discuss how to leverage this concept to seize on the creativity and business agility to make it real. Speaker Bio Valentin (Val) Bercovici, a longtime NetApp executive and member of the Office of the CTO, is now part of SolidFire as CTO. In this new role, Bercovici leads SolidFire's Office of the CTO (SFOCTO) which ... (more)

When Agile, DevOps and Lean Are Not Enough By @BettyZakheim | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps

Lean, Agile and DevOps principles have improved software delivery in many important ways. As evolving markets compel software organizations to increase quality and productivity, interest in these concepts has never been higher. But despite their considerable merits, individually and collectively, they can fall short in addressing the full range of issues confronted by modern software organizations. To close the gaps, these principles must be knitted together in a way that allows you to realize the full potential of your people, processes and technologies. The fastest and most effective way to do this is to create an integrated software lifecycle. From planning, development and testing to deployment and maintenance, integrating all the tools required to accomplish all the tasks related to software delivery will allow information to flow freely from practitioner to pr... (more)

The Agile PMO

Tom Jenkins, the newly appointed PMO manager convened his team. Xavier, Paula and Xing were eager to start work. Tom explained that the PMO rollout is a change process. He gave his team assignments around stakeholder analysis, mapping of communication requirements, and creation of the PMO newsletter. While the team was somewhat puzzled with these activities they moved to fulfill them. Working with the stakeholders, the team captured many complaints pertaining to the current way of work and gathered numerous requests for improvements. Eagerly awaiting their next meeting, which was held virtually through a videoconference, they prepared a list of proposed improvements. Xavier proposed to commence work on the work breakdown structure and the software development lifecycle. Paula suggested to update the risk register template and to implement a new tool for project sc... (more)

Agile 101 - Three Practical Guidelines for Business Decisions

In order to create the combination between top-down problem-decisions (waterfall like approaches)and local problem-decisions (Agile project approach) here are practical guidelines to pursue Three practical complex decision-problems guidelines: Simple local rules Strategic top down rules Visual problem view We describe in detail, each practical guideline, below. Simple local rules This cannot be overstated. Local rules must be easy to follow. Whether these are rules for: a machine operator, traveling salesperson, a project coordinator, or you packing your bags. The local decision rules are the ones mostly used, they must be easy to follow, understandable, and unequivocal. Consider the warehouse forklift operator who is re- stocking raw material. If she needs to follow a complex decision protocol for placing newly arrived material in the warehouse, it would result in c... (more)

The Odd Couple: Marrying Agile and Waterfall

This article depicts the best practice approach for integrating Agile approaches and specifically Scrum development with traditional overarching linear approaches, specifically waterfall methodology. The agile PMO, properly defined, can be positioned to secure Agile-Scrum benefits while maintaining the necessary overarching control. The challenge Over the last two decades, various Agile approaches have been introduced and practiced. Of these, in last 5 to 7 years, Scrum has gained the most popularity resulting from a combination of simplicity, ease of use, and effective public relations. Scrum success in software development organizations has been a powerful driver for roll outs across products, industries and businesses. As described, this was exacerbated by a focused marketing effort from Scrum evangelists. Unfortunately, most of these organizations were not stru... (more)

What Software Development Should Not Learn from Manufacturing

In software engineering there have always been two schools of thought. One school feels that there is a lot to learn from manufacturing. The other school thinks that they are entirely different. There have been three distinct phases in this debate: CMM Phase: Manufacturing has transitioned from craftsmanship to mass production – productivity and quality has improved many-fold. Software development can also benefit from such transition. CMM movement was born from this thought. Agile Phase: Manufacturing deals with machine, software development deals with people. Processes involving machines can be controlled precisely. People are inherently different and are not interchangeable. People communicate better face to face rather than through written documentation. From this realization agile movement was born. Lean Phase: Toyota revolutionized manufacturing through lean m... (more)

Agile Trends – Minus the Hype

Surprise, surprise … Agile has never appeared in the Gartner Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies. So, the task of separating the hype from reality becomes simpler. The reality, Scott Ambler says, is that “…you’d have a hard time these days trying to find people who don’t want to be agile…” Agile is like a starfish – you can cut one arm of an (starfish) Agile methodology and let it grow to (a full starfish) a tailored agile methodology to suited for your needs. Now coming back to question 3 & 4 – [You need to read this post in conjunction with my earlier post where I had raised 4 questions and answered 2 of them]. 3. If the current trend continues then where will it be in one year time? For the majority, there will be two distinct style of agile adoption where the focus will be on … …checklist based adoption: as long as you follow a series of steps recommended by th... (more)

Agile 101: Product Owner - Improved Insight into Customer Needs

In a Scrum-Agile project management environment, the product owner acts as a catalyst of change in the organization, enabling value creation through projects and products. Product owners create the required link between how the business would look like in the future and the current state. The product owner is a key facilitator within the organization in bridging the client and the business community with the Agile development team. Most of what a product owner performs can be defined in the broader sense as: 1) Creating and increasing value for the business, and 2) Eliminating and reducing costs for the business. The product owner is required to identify business needs and determine solutions to business challenges. We can characterize the role description of the product owner as related to the above tasks into several key responsibilities. The product owner needs t... (more)

Agile Practices Now Have Research Support

Adam Smith was wrong. Well … he was not wrong in his conclusion but he was partially wrong in his basic assumption that human always pursue their self-interest. Through the work of many scientists, we have begun to see evidence across several disciplines that people are in fact more cooperative and selfless—or behave far less selfishly—than we have assumed. In fact, recent research shows that in any society majority of us behave cooperatively rather than selfishly (though some people do behave selfishly). The essence of agile is iterative development and a self-organizing team (What makes Agile agile?). Latest research suggests that iterative approach with trial and error is the best way to navigate through our environment which has become exceedingly complex. Such research is inspired by biology and evolution. Now you have research evidence that we are indeed tune... (more)

CollabNet Adds Board Member and Senior Executives to Fuel Continued Growth in Agile ALM and Enterprise Cloud Development

BRISBANE, Calif., Jan. 26, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- CollabNet® (www.collab.net), the global leader for enterprise cloud development and Agile ALM products and services, today announced the addition of Promod Haque, a managing partner at Norwest Venture Partners, as a new board member, and the appointment of two senior executives to its management team. In addition to Haque, CollabNet added Tony Farinaro as senior vice president, worldwide services and Laurence Sweeney as vice president, enterprise transformation. "CollabNet is coming off a record year of growth and success as we continue to help a growing number of enterprise customers adopt and scale Agile and cloud-based development strategies from concept through deployment," said Bill Portelli, CollabNet's CEO and co-founder. "To build upon our momentum and better serve our customers we are very pleased to st... (more)

Agility Is Not a Methodology

Lori and I were discussing the entire topic of agility the other day, she looking at it from the SDN prospective, and I from the evolutionary perspective for development. While I know there has been a metric ton of writing about the topic, since I’ve used agile development, and find it to be useful, but didn’t become a fanatic on my first agile project, I thought some perspective might be in order. There is a reason why absolutists always fail in technology. Not just because high-tech is always changing – which makes absolutism fleeting at best  - but because the part that determines whether computer scientists get to be absolutists on topics as varied as “object purism”, “No [fill in mobile device since first Palm] on my network”, or “We’re an X shop” is not at all scientific. Nor is making absolute statements, unless you’re discussing a proven fact. Money and by... (more)